We do ceremonies for many of life’s transitions – baby showers, weddings, and more. When one is faced with divorce, creating a ceremony isn’t something most consider doing. However, a divorce ceremony can help you emotionally and spiritually, and create an intention of how you want it all to go. And that is the topic of this week’s episode. 

The Ceremonialist, Georgia Wall, joins me to discuss what the divorce ceremony process could look like and how ceremonies are a reverent and intentional act that brings us closer to our innermost sense of knowing, always with the aim of honoring our own humanity as well as the humanity of all people.

We also discuss the various ways in which you can create a ceremony for yourself and work to cut the chords of the divorce process. I invite you to listen to this episode with an open heart and receive the possibilities of this spiritual wellness work. 

Show Highlights

  • How Georgia came to this work and what kind of ceremonies she helps to create. (6:43)

  • Ceremonies for internal shifts, including acknowledging the painful parts of life and figuring out where you want to be. (7:50)

  • Being intentional about what you are stepping into or stepping away from. (11:24)

  • The various stages of divorce and the ceremonies that you can create – like one for finding clarity and one for the actual divorce. (19:53)

  • The ceremony creation process and some of the deep insights uncovered. (20:22)

  • When you name something (your divorce, your realization that you should go, or decision to stay) with intention, helps you to see all the places where your various thoughts and feelings exist. (33:12)

  • Spiritual practices help you to set an intention. (37:47)

Learn More About Georgia Wall:

Georgia Wall is an artist, educator, and Ceremonialist based in New York City.  She offers personalized ceremonies to individuals, groups & communities. Rather than adhering to a specific practice or lineage, Georgia “seeks to uncover the specific inner ceremony that an individual or a group carries within them — the ceremony that is necessary and arising for the given moment, born from lived experience.” She considers her practice of ceremony a process of co-creation with the people she works with. Georgia has created ceremonies to acknowledge and honor everything from births to deaths, to the more intimate rights of passage, like the end of a romantic relationship or a decision to have an abortion. Georgia describes a ceremony as “a reverent and intentional act that brings us closer to our innermost sense of knowing, always with the aim of honoring our own humanity as well as the humanity of all people”

Resources & Links:

Georgia’s website

The Ultimate Divorce Survival Guide

Should I Stay or Should I Go Facebook Group